El·e·na [el-uh-nuh, uh-ley-nuh; It. e-le-nah] /ˈɛlənə, əˈleɪnə; It. ɛˈlɛnɑ/ –noun a female given name, form of Helen // A proud student of His Eminence Tsem Rinpoche // Personal assistant with a BSc (Hons) Psych from Uni of Warwick // These are snapshots of my life, in words and pictures

The day I met a true Muslim

February 3, 2012 2

justin It’s Friday prayers here in Malaysia. Every week, it makes me think back to the night Justin died.

We were in the van rushing to the hospital, because the ambulance had taken too damn long.

When we pulled up outside a mosque, all the men came running out to ask what was happening. After we told them, immediately they walked into the middle of the busy street, blocking off the heavy traffic so the ambulance could make its way through.

When the EMTs lifted Justin’s heavy body into the ambulance, they helped without asking.

When the ambulance was about to leave with Justin, they blocked off the traffic again.

When I asked them for their names to come back later and thank them, they said NO NEED.

They folded their hands in prayer and said they will pray for him to be okay.

Muslim brothers praying for a Buddhist man from New Zealand whom they’ve never met. Real compassion, real religion, real spirituality does not discriminate. That is why I will NEVER believe true Muslims are evil terrorists, and why I am proud to live in Malaysia.

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2 Comments → “The day I met a true Muslim”

  1. Jim Yeh 6 years ago   Reply

    This is a great post. Very touching. I have heard many stories about Justin and everyone spoke highly of him.

    The Muslim brothers set a very powerful example that day, we should help all sentient beings irregardless of their beliefs. There’s enough suffering to go around for everyone, so let’s try to lessen it.

  2. Gim Lee 6 years ago   Reply

    I have many Muslims friends who are kind and they had also helped me when I am in need. Many years ago, when one of my aunt was hospitalised and needed bloods to save her, it was my Muslim friends who came in groups to donate bloods. When I invite them for drink & food, they politely declined. What really touched me was that most of them who came didn’t know me personally.

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